Thursday, April 23, 2009

The Trade Room

Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site is a reconstructed 1840’s adobe fur trading post on the Arkansas river along the Santa Fe Trail near La Junta, Colorado. Traders, trappers, travelers, and Plains Indian tribes came here for trade.

The fort now has living historians recreate the sights, sounds, and smells of the past. Many of the rooms in the fort have been laid out with items that one may have seen in its heyday. This room is the fort's general store, or trade room. It carried merchandise that was traded or sold to trappers, Indians, and travelers.

If you'd like to see more of my photos of Bent's Old Fort, point your browser here.

9 comments:

Tricia said...

How did you get that copper look? That's really nice & sets the mood for what it actually is.
Kudos to you!

cieldequimper said...

That's a fantastic photo of a place I think I would very much enjoy!

cieldequimper said...

P.S.: your other photos of Bent's old fort are absolutely gorgeous too.

Ron Davis said...

Would you mind if I referenced your blog on a City-data.com forum? There is a thead there that is not active and this would be a nice addition to it.

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Thanks

Misty Dawn said...

Don't ask me to say exactly why, because I can't... but I really, really like this photo! I find myself just staring at it. This is really great!

Russ said...

Thanks all!

Tricia, this effect is complicated. I use Photoshop Elements. I suppose if I used the real photoshop, it could be automated.

Any any event, here are the steps in general:
1. Converted to good monochrome B&W
2. Made two duplicate layers (call them d1 & d2)
3. On layer d1 (1st copy), I grouped it with a reddish photo filter layer.
4. On layer d2, I grouped it with a lighter beige photo filter.
5. Twiddle with the density of the two photo filter layers to get pleasing color.
6. On top of these, I added a 50% grey fill layer, and then applied a gaussian blur to it. This layer will add 'grain' to the darker areas.
7. Grouped a levels layer with the one in step 8. Added a mask for the darker areas (so they would get the 'grain').
9. Added a vignettee
10. Did one more level adjustment layer to twiddle the overall levels.

I may have missed a few steps. This did take me a few hours. I was shooting for the look of a lithograph. I does feel as if its printed on copper.

Most of my photoshop experiments fail horribly (peasants with pitch forks at the door style-of-thing).

Bryan said...

I like it. That's an interesting workflow.

If those peasants bother you, place some trust in your door. They're quite pitchfork-resistant these days.

Tricia said...

It sounds difficult, but I'm going to give it a try! I enjoy photo editing & learning new things involving photography. I'll show my results if they're not too horrible, like peasants w/ pitch forks at the door! hehehe Good one & Thank you for responding!

Russ said...

Yeah, let me know how it goes. Ya gotta create a few Frankenphotos along the path of learning. :)